The Hardy Amies influence

Single left men's black leather Chelsea boot; Clarks 'Savarin', 1964

Single left men’s black leather Chelsea boot; Clarks ‘Savarin’, 1964

Hardy Amies first gained recognition in the fashion business designing women’s clothes.  He started training in the 1930s before starting his own business in 1945 and being appointed Dressmaker to H.M. Queen Elizabeth.  He was eventually appointed as Design Consultant to the Men’s Division of Clarks in 1962, collaborating with Hugh Brooking Clark.  Hugh believed that Clarks’ men’s division would benefit development and expansion.  This involved making the men’s ranges more attractive and saleable, which was to be achieved using Amies’ name, and his knowledge about men’s fit and style.

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The Dilemmas of Collections Management

These ‘Duskdawn’ shoes were made in 1957, and are from the Skyline collection.

Pair women's blue/silver brocade/leather court shoes; Clarks Skyline 'Duskdawn', 1957

This image exemplifies the inevitable consequence of displaying our collection in a museum case.  Whilst the shoe on the right hand side has been held in a box away from any light, the shoe on the left has been on display in the museum, and has consequently sustained damage from the light used to illuminate it.  This is because light sources within the case can emit both light (visible radiation) and UV (ultraviolet radiation) which fades colorants, making the shoe lose its original colour.  Light sources can not only change the colour of organic materials such as this, but can also change the strength of textiles, making them weak, brittle, or disintegrate.

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Measuring Feet in the 21st Century

Clarks electronic foot measuring devices from 1967, 1996, 2000 and 2006

Clarks electronic foot measuring devices from 1967, 1996, 2000 and 2006

The Archive often deals with enquiries about foot measuring at Clarks and a new initiative has just been launched by the company which builds on its long heritage of foot fitting. An article on the BBC News website shows how iPads have been adapted for foot fitting and shows several examples of gauges from our collection.

This project has been running at Clarks for some time and the Archive has been donated examples of the prototypes for the permanent collection.

Short hair for girls in the Clark family – can you solve the mystery?

Can you help with a mystery which has been bugging the Trust staff for some time? We have a large collection of photographs relating to the Clark and related families in Street, Somerset. Several of the young girls in the family wore their hair very short in late 19th century, and we have always been curious as to finding a reason. The Trust staff haven’t come across this in any other photographs from the period on their travels through other family archives of a similar timeframe.

There may have been some medical grounds for this, since Helen Priestman Bright Clark’s family had a history of TB. Helen was generally very protective on the health front for her children, moving the family home from the factory to a new house on the outskirts of the village (now Millfield School of sporting prowess).

Clark and Morland family group, 1880s

Clark and Morland family group, 1880s

There is a good example of short hair for the girls in the family in this photograph (mid 1880s). Two of the group suffered from TB, one dying of it fairly soon afterwards as a teenager (Pollie Morland) and one suffering from it at various points in her life (Alice Clark).

The photograph shows Helen Clark’s four daughters. Esther (born 1873) is the eldest and is presumably growing her hair out (shoulder length, second from left in back row). The three younger Clark sisters, Alice (back row furthest right), Margaret and Hilda (seated, third and fourth from left), all have short hair, along with their Morland cousin Eleanor/Nelly. Pollie Morland (standing, furthest left, born 1872) also has bobbed hair. Alice in particular (born 1874) wore very short hair even as an adult, which seems unusual during the late Victorian/Edwardian era. Age doesn’t necessarily seem to dictate this, since Esther and Alice are just one year apart.

Does anyone know of other instances of this, or could anyone point Trust staff in the direction of a hairstyle expert who could give us some further ideas for research? Please email the Trust with suggestions – we’d love to hear from you!

Major Exhibition Opens at the Museum of Bath at Work

Clarks_vintage_Desert_Boot_advertThe World’s Most Travelled Shoe: Celebrating 65 Years of the Desert Boot

10 April – 31 October 2015

Come with us on a journey from Cairo to Burma to Chicago and Jamaica, across Death Valley in California, to 1960s Paris, and Weston-Super-Mare!

Clarks has sold more than 10million pairs of Desert Boots in over 100 countries and the boot rightly deserves its place as one of The 50 Shoes that Changed the World as well as its title of the World’s Most Travelled Shoe.

To celebrate the 65th anniversary of this British icon The Shoe Museum in collaboration with The Museum of Bath at Work is presenting the story of the Desert Boot in a new exhibition.

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Digging in the Clarks Archives

ClarksOriginals-Tim-Crumplin-Medium1

Our Research Archivist Tim Crumplin was recently interviewed for the Clarks Originals website and gave a guided tour of our facilities and collections.

He explores everything from the importance of archives and the significance of the iconic Desert Boot, to the future aspirations of the Trust.

Read the interview here.

Killer Heels

The Alfred Gillett Trust not only takes care of Clarks shoes, but also shoes belonging to many other companies.

World War II had a huge impact on footwear fashion through the 1940s, and continued to influence trends during the 1950s.

High heels were banned in 1942 as part of the war effort, when there was a restriction on materials due to rationing, including supplies of leather.  One consequence of rationing within Britain was the height of heels.  The maximum heel height allowed was 5 centimetres.  As a result a minimal heel, if any, was usually worn, with high heels only making their appearance during formal occasions.

Rationing continued after the war, and only ended completely in 1952.  Between the end of World War II and 1952, however, restrictions on styles were lifted.  Soon after the ending of the war medium-sized heels were still worn, but there was a re-introduction of pre-war styles, including peep toes and high heels for everyday wear.

This dramatic example of a high-heeled court shoe demonstrates the extremes that were achieved, and the creativity that was unleashed after the restrictive prohibition on high heels.

Single women's black leather court shoe; London House, c.1947

It was made in around 1947 and was created by London House.  The heel measures 13 centimetres in height.  However the height of the heel is only possible because of the depth of the platform, which is 3.5 cm deep.  The height of the platform is important, as there comes a point at which the arch of the foot prevents the heel from going any higher, making it impossible to wear.  The platform allows the height of the heel to be achieved.

The Trust Waves Goodbye to Eureka

Last Thursday, Neil Bollen (metal conservator), Neil’s son Rupert and Alma Rahat (University of Exeter) came to Street and took the Eureka machine away to be conserved and given lots of TLC in an AHRC project.

Moving the machine proved rather a challenge. As shelving had been installed in the storeroom around the machine, it all had to be moved out of the way to make room for the machine to come down the aisle. This meant moving lots of our most recently accessioned Point of Sale material from Clarks which is stored here temporarily until it is catalogued and moved into the archive permanently.

We decided that the alternative route out of the fire exit across the wet and boggy grass in the Trust’s apple orchard wasn’t really a viable option on such a grim day!

Neil had made a wooden cradle for the machine cabinet to sit on whilst it was being moved, so it proved a challenge to slide the cabinet off and onto it safely. The next step was to get the machine and cradle onto the trolley. Then it was plain sailing to wheel the machine out of the Barn and through the external doorway.

On turning the bottom table base unit upside-down to go into the van, we discovered that the base unit is actually mounted on wooden wheels.

There was another anxious moment when it transpired that the machine might not fit into the transit van as it was too tall. Luckily, sliding it off its lifting cradle meant we just had enough room by a whisker. Neil & Co drove off into a mini hail storm as dusk fell, but arrived in Exeter safely. Here the engineering technicians gave a hand in unloading the machine.

The following morning, it was winched upstairs into the Harrison Building where the doorframe had to be dismantled in order to get the machine through into its new home. And we wondered why the machine hadn’t moved for so many years.

The next steps will be for Neil to take a closer look at the machine and for the project team to meet and start planning the project in detail. Exciting times ahead!

More news to follow as the project progresses during 2015…

The Trust Waves Goodbye to Eureka

Last Thursday, Neil Bollen (metal conservator), Neil’s son Rupert and Alma Rahat (University of Exeter) came to Street and took the Eureka machine away to be conserved and given lots of TLC in an AHRC project.

Moving the machine proved rather a challenge. As shelving had been installed in the storeroom around the machine, it all had to be moved out of the way to make room for the machine to come down the aisle. This meant moving lots of our most recently accessioned Point of Sale material from Clarks which is stored here temporarily until it is catalogued and moved into the archive permanently.

We decided that the alternative route out of the fire exit across the wet and boggy grass in the Trust’s apple orchard wasn’t really a viable option on such a grim day!

Neil had made a wooden cradle for the machine cabinet to sit on whilst it was being moved, so it proved a challenge to slide the cabinet off and onto it safely. The next step was to get the machine and cradle onto the trolley. Then it was plain sailing to wheel the machine out of the Barn and through the external doorway.

On turning the bottom table base unit upside-down to go into the van, we discovered that the base unit is actually mounted on wooden wheels.

There was another anxious moment when it transpired that the machine might not fit into the transit van as it was too tall. Luckily, sliding it off its lifting cradle meant we just had enough room by a whisker. Neil & Co drove off into a mini hail storm as dusk fell, but arrived in Exeter safely. Here the engineering technicians gave a hand in unloading the machine.

The following morning, it was winched upstairs into the Harrison Building where the doorframe had to be dismantled in order to get the machine through into its new home. And we wondered why the machine hadn’t moved for so many years.

The next steps will be for Neil to take a closer look at the machine and for the project team to meet and start planning the project in detail. Exciting times ahead!

More news to follow as the project progresses during 2016…

Lions and Buffaloes and Bears

19770s Peter Lord shoe shops displays

The Alfred Gillett Trust recently acquired a set of three plywood animals which had been used for displays in Peter Lord shoe shops in the 1970s. They make a lovely addition to the shop furnishings and retail display material that we collect alongside the footwear and archive collections.

Visitors to the Shoe Museum can see a few items of shop furniture, including a chair styled on a drum and several foot measuring machines. They are particularly evocative for those of us who so clearly remember the ritual of shopping for school shoes.

When the animals came in they were very dirty, having been kept in warehouse-style storage for many years; unfortunately they also have some water damage which has removed the top layer of varnish in places. After a clean with some brushes, a Museum Vac and a bit of Renaissance Wax they look a bit better, and are ready to go into clean and environmentally controlled storage in the zoo archive.